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These representations can only be read through an understanding of the questions that the first two sections of the book raise; we can only decode these representations if we take into account form and genre, and theoretical conceptualisations such as visual pleasure, spectacle, the uncanny, realism etc. Animators work within a strictly defined, limited space that requires difficult artistic decisions.

The blank frame presents a dilemma for all animators, and the decision of what to include and leave out raises important questions about artistry, authorship, and cultural influence. Telotte explores how animation has confronted the blank template, and how responses to that confrontation have changed. Focusing on American animation, Telotte tracks the development of animation in line with changing cultural attitudes toward space and examines innovations that elevated the medium from a novelty to a fully realized art form.

The Disney Fetish.

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Long considered a figurehead of family values and wholesome adolescence, the Disney franchise has faced increasing criticism over its gendered representations of children in film, its stereotypical representations of race and non-white cultures, and its emphasis on the heterosexual couple. This compelling study demystifies the unsettling cleanliness and pretensions to innocence that the Disney brand claims to hold.


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Annalee R. Kids around the world love Disney animated films, and many of their parents trust the Disney corporation to provide wholesome, moral entertainment for their children. Yet frequent protests and even boycotts of Disney products and practices reveal a widespread unease with the sometimes mixed and inconsistent moral values espoused in Disney films as the company attempts to appeal to the largest possible audience.

About the author

Anime: A History. Jonathan Clements.


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  • Similar ebooks. Emile Cohl, Caricature, and Film. Donald Crafton. This is the definitive biography of Emile Cohl , one of the most important pioneers of the art of the animated cartoon and an innovative contributor to popular graphic humor at a critical moment when it changed from traditional caricature to the modern comic strip. This profusely illustrated book provides not only a wealth of information on Cohl's life but also an analysis of his contribution to the development of the animation film in both France and the United States and an interpretation of how the new genre fit into the historical shift from a "primitive" to a "classical" cinema.

    In its theory and history, the book is one of the most important contributions to [the field of animated film]. But [it] is central for film study per se, offering a fresh, exciting look at the complicated world of early cinema.

    Animating Space

    Michael Barrier. Walt Disney was one of the most significant creative forces of the twentieth century, a man who made a lasting impact on the art of the animated film, the history of American business, and the evolution of twentieth-century American culture. He was both a creative visionary and a dynamic entrepreneur, roles whose demands he often could not reconcile. In his compelling new biography, noted animation historian Michael Barrier avoids the well-traveled paths of previous biographers, who have tended to portray a blemish-free Disney or to indulge in lurid speculation.

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    Instead, he takes the full measure of the man in his many aspects. A consummate storyteller, Barrier describes how Disney transformed himself from Midwestern farm boy to scrambling young businessman to pioneering artist and, finally, to entrepreneur on a grand scale. Now almost all deceased, only a few were ever interviewed for other books. Later 20th-century animation, in turn, is compared to the extreme flatness and time—space compression often associated with postmodernity or conditions resulting from an expanded mediascape.

    Instead, Telotte contends that animating space and playing with graphical depth maintain moments of creativity, subversive experimentation, as well as social and political resistance. Telotte claims that animation does not fail by realism or succeed by fantasy, but that fantasy oper- ates in contrast to reality. Thus, despite changes in the technical and social landscapes of products and production, the history presented in Animating Space highlights an ongoing negotiation between depth and flatness, realism and fantasy. For instance, Telotte analyzes the proscenium-crossing work of Winsor McCay, whose anima- tion seemingly assaults spatial conventions.

    Likewise, early Mickey Mouse films, such as Plane Crazy , feature increased dimensionality to stage gags that disrupt realistic spatial conventions.

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    The animators had to make choices in respect to contemporary competitors Disney and other media cinema, comics. Additionally, such productions enhance realistic depth over the flat animation championed by modernists. Since depicting fantastic images that subvert conventional notions of space, time, and movement require recognizable ele- ments of reality, Telotte concludes that both subversion and realism are intrinsic to animation. Bambi may advance realism, but they also harbor a serious interest in nonhuman space — both the technical and the natural — that engages animators and audiences.

    While Telotte discusses Warner Bros. Narratives about integrating new or disparate technologies in cinematic space, Telotte notes, gain significance during the influx of digital technologies in the s and s. It is during that period, for instance, that Pixar introduced many audiences to computer anima- tion.

    Animating Space, From Mickey to WALL-E by J. P. Telotte | | Booktopia

    For Telotte, the superior dimensionality and new fantasy-realism possibilities of computer animation make it capable of restoring dimensions to postmodern life. This narrative about heroes finding space to use their powers directly correlates with digital animators creating space to utilize the fantastic capabilities of computer animation. Obviously computer animation has substantially altered spaces of animation production as software applications involve modifying digitized, motion-capture images or computer models.

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    Harry Potter. Popular Features. New Releases. Description Animators work within a strictly defined, limited space that requires difficult artistic decisions. The blank frame presents a dilemma for all animators, and the decision of what to include and leave out raises important questions about artistry, authorship, and cultural influence. Telotte explores how animation has confronted the blank template, and how responses to that confrontation have changed.

    Focusing on American animation, Telotte tracks the development of animation in line with changing cultural attitudes toward space and examines innovations that elevated the medium from a novelty to a fully realized art form.