Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Lesson Plans Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Lesson Plans Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto book. Happy reading Lesson Plans Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Lesson Plans Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Lesson Plans Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto Pocket Guide.
Teaching Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto

Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto Summary & Study Guide

This book continues to be required reading for all Americans, whatever their special interest. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published May 15th by University of Oklahoma Press first published More Details Original Title. Anisfield-Wolf Book Award Other Editions 2. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.


  • The headline is still 'Custer Died For Your Sins'.
  • Lets Get Cracking!: A Branches Book (Kung Pow Chicken #1)?
  • The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven Lesson Plan.
  • Deloria's Anthropologists and Other Friends by Emily Post on Prezi.
  • Relationship to Other Books.

To ask other readers questions about Custer Died for Your Sins , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Custer Died for Your Sins. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details.

Record Citations

More filters. Sort order. Jun 14, Traci rated it it was amazing. I read this when I was about 16 and it changed my life. I know that sounds hokey, but this book, "God is Red," and "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee," flipped a switch in my head that I have never wanted to turn off. I was raised by civil rights activists, and my dad was born on an Indian reservation in the Midwest he is not Indian so I had some sort of context for what Deloria was talking about Deloria lit the fi I read this when I was about 16 and it changed my life.

The pre-contact period is easier to manage than the modern history Deloria recounts I choose the easier context because its so beautiful and less painful View all 3 comments. Apr 04, M. Kei rated it it was amazing Shelves: history-american. Hilarious and truthful, you never knew history could be this entertaining--and this horrifying. Vine Deloria is a Native American author who explains why American Indians are not quietly vanishing the way conquered people are supposed to.

Clyde Bellecourt: “Custer Died for Your Sins” (1971)

The absolutely horrible things that are still happening to Native Nations in the United States are repetitions and replays of what has been going on for hundreds of years, and if one is gifted with a dark and surrealistic sense of humor, it's incredibly funny, Hilarious and truthful, you never knew history could be this entertaining--and this horrifying. The absolutely horrible things that are still happening to Native Nations in the United States are repetitions and replays of what has been going on for hundreds of years, and if one is gifted with a dark and surrealistic sense of humor, it's incredibly funny, too, in the way that it's funny when you watch somebody crack his nuts on the board when he flubs a dive off the high board.

You have to laugh If you want to know more about Native Americans than the highly sanitized and stereotyped images on greeting cards and t-shirt, start here. I went in looking to understand the Native American, and finished with a greater understanding of the world. I got something different out of this book that I wasn't expecting. Going in, I wasn't sure what the meat and bone of the book would detail, and I certainly didn't know the I went in looking to understand the Native American, and finished with a greater understanding of the world.

Going in, I wasn't sure what the meat and bone of the book would detail, and I certainly didn't know the nuances of modern Native American culture. On one hand, I had the vague knowledge that Native American culture, above western culture, understands that there is a spiritual aspect to life that transcends monetary value. The earth is not so much ours, so much as WE belong to it. This, along with a few other impactful statements, quotes and general history thank you Mr. Howard Zinn had been the extent of my knowledge before being introduced to Vine Deloria Jr.

For anyone reading this, Custer Died for Your Sins will inform you on a number of topics.


  1. See a Problem?.
  2. Yes You Can!: Everything You Need From A to Z to Influence Others to Take Action;
  3. Full Lesson Plan Overview.
  4. Breakaway by Andrea Montalbano: Book Club Meeting Planner.
  5. Custer Died for Your Sins - WikiVisually?
  6. These range from disseminating the real and unreal perceptions of Native Americans; dismantling the 'The Anthropologist' laugh out loud chapter ; breaking down the Native view on western religion and the missionary situation; understanding the government agencies dealing with the tribes; shedding light on Native humour; contrasting the civil rights movement with the wants and needs of natives; and, last but not least, how Native Americans can move forward from their current situation.

    He must examine his past. He must face the problems he has created within himself and within others. Before the white man can relate to others he must forego the pleasure of denying them. The white man must learn to stop viewing history as a plot against himself. It was more than religious intolerance that drove the early colonists across the ocean.

    More than a thousand years before Columbus, the barbaric tribes destroyed the Roman Empire. Christanity swept across the conquerors like the white man later swept across North America, destroying native religions and leaving paralyzed groups of disoriented individuals in its wake. Then the combination of Christian theology, superstition, and forms of the old Roman civil government began to control the tamed barbaric tribes. Gone were the religious rites of the white tribesmen.

    It's a shame this book hasn't received an update on the various issues discussed in its pages. Apart from a preface written in from the author- something I would recommend reading before AND after finishing- there's little more to find that will sate the interest of the reader believe me, you'll want to know how certain aspects of the communities spoken of are doing now. I do feel this is important specifically to this book it is a manifesto after all , as I felt at times I was reading something solely stuck in it's time period, with no additional notes added in it's pages.

    As such, this does make for slower reading as you feel you may be taking in information that actually doesn't hold precedent in the 'now'.


    • Left Behind: Latin America and the False Promise of Populism.
    • Essay Topic 1.
    • Ten Tales for the Campfire: A Collection of Spooky Short Stories.
    • C# 5.0 All-in-One For Dummies!

    The only other reason this has four stars is due to a disagreement I had with Delorias on the concept of Corporations, and how he believed the infusion of a Native American tribalism could be combined with the concept of the White Mans attempt at tribalism to make Indian lives better. I won't go into detail seeing that as a white male living in London, I really can't judge concepts being thought up by a man 4, miles away, who was trying to better the lives of his people, and who, in turn, were very well aquatinted with the difficulties experienced and still experienced on a daily basis with the once imported, now mutated capitalist juggernaut that is the United States government.

    However, I will say that I found it weirdly contradictory that he mentions Native Americans rising again to their former glory in some form , only to then talk about the above concept, which, to my eyes, seems like a massive compromise on the behalf of the Native American people to take a white concept, and turn it into something good for the original people of the American land.

    Navigation menu

    Another discussion for another time I think. However, this will not ruin the effect this book will have on the reader, and you will come out a better person for having opened it. Jul 24, Virginia Arthur rated it it was amazing. Recently I read an interview with a Native American academic. The interview, written by a white journalist, was all about the ways Native Americans appreciate the earth, in other words, the kind of bullshit that drove Vine up the wall. Here we go romanticizing the Indian again. When I worked as a biologist in Alaska and we went to Tongass, there were sections of Tongass that were clearcut to nothing, including the riparian areas--down to dirt, nothing left.

    It looked like a nuclear bomb. I thoug Recently I read an interview with a Native American academic. I thought it was the USFS that did it but it wasn't. It was the native Alaskan tribal corporation that raped the forests on this island. They destroyed acres and acres of pristine habitat, endangered species.

    Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto Lesson Plans for Teachers

    Native American tribes in Montana mine and damage their lands and their relationships with one another--for coal. I had a native American woman in my ecology class a few years ago that talked to me about it. It was tearing the res' apart and still is. Vine was ahead of his time, ahead of these developments, but he foresaw the inevitable capitalistic conversion of the Native American--and in this book sets us up for it.

    What our ancestors did was cultural genocide. They wiped out the indigenous people of this continent in the most brutal of ways and now we want to go back and "appreciate" the Indian way What the hell choice do they really have at this point? Maybe whites need the myth of the "Indian way" for some reason but how fair is this? How dare we hold the Indian to higher standards than we hold ourselves-- is what Vine would say, did say.

    I had the chance to hear him speak a few times. He had a way too of making us all laugh--at ourselves. Vine had a huge influence on me. Mention of this book, along with the TMWGang, is in my own novel. Vine was a Truth Teller. How I miss our Truth Tellers. Feb 10, Steven Yenzer rated it it was ok. Meandering and often vague. Along with the wit, there is a heavy dose of theory, which is not particularly compelling. I learned a lot about Indian culture, but I also learned that white culture either doesn't exist or is founded on violence and exploitation.

    A good chunk of the book is taken up with Deloria Jr. For him, there is little really, nothing wrong with Indian culture, which is infinitely wise, holistic, Meandering and often vague. For him, there is little really, nothing wrong with Indian culture, which is infinitely wise, holistic, and eternal. On the other hand, America and American culture are meaningless and have accomplished nothing.

    It's not that I mind criticism of America — I just mind it when it isn't based on facts and history but rather, theory and ideology. Deloria Jr. Along with this is his less-than-subtle, somewhat prophetic declarations that Indians will one day drive whites out of America and retake their land.

    Again, I don't have a problem with the sentiment. But it's the "evidence" Deloria Jr. For example, he cites the restoration of Israel to the Jews as evidence that, like them, Indians will eventually retake their homeland. Not only is this an obviously fallacious argument, but it also relies upon "white culture's" artificial creation of Israel.

    So the violent, destructive, possibly non-existent culture seems to have produced at least one thing upon which Deloria Jr.

    Search Tips

    Apr 03, Gina rated it liked it. My feelings are very mixed on this book. Deloria is an interesting thinker, and his view of how the future would work out, and his contemporary situation was interesting. His scathing humor was often enjoyable, including his section on anthropologists.